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20121222
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american president had made in modern times on the whole question of civil rights and voting rights. he condemned the violence over and over again, and near the end of the speech he said, "and we shall overcome. we shall overcome." we call it the "we shall overcome" speech. i was sitting next to dr. martin luther king jr. as we listened to president johnson. i looked at dr. king. tears came down his face. he started crying. and we all cried a little when we heard the president saying, "we shall overcome." and dr. king said, "we will make it from selma to montgomery, and the voting rights act will be passed." two weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conversation af
by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the freedom rides and spoke at the 1963 march on washington. he has been arrested more than 40 times and has just written a new book called across that vision for change. he visited us in our studio, and i asked congressmember lewis about the voter purge in florida, where the justice department had sued to block republican governor rick scott's controversial effort to remove thousands of registered voters from the rolls, using an outdated drivers' license database to ostensibly identify non-citizens registered to vote. rep. john lewis: it is unreal, it is unbelievable, that at this time in our history, 47 years after the voting rights act was passed and signed into law, that we're trying to go backward. i think there is a systema
are not hatch in three days. it would take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [ap
a program called, who is the dean of the civil rights movement, dean of black leadership, who at the whole idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago would say from time to time, maybe our foremothers and forefathers thought came to this great land in different shapes. but we all in the same boat now. so it doesn't matter whether we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether a democrat or republicans. it doesn't matter whether we are straight. it does another whether jewish or not psalm, christians, we are one people. we are one family. we are one house spirit that's what the struggle been about. [applause] this book, "across that bridge" is saying in effect they struggle is a struggle to retain the soul of america. it's not a struggled the last one day, one week, one month, one year for one lifetime. maybe we take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union. to create the beloved community. the community at peace with itself. now you heard david tell you that i did get arrested a few times. and young people coming out chi
will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much for that, lisa. >>> in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the nr after the wants to put armed volunteers in every american school. the proposal facing heavy criticism. the man in charge is here to defend it. plus how the host of nbc's "meet the press" may have broken washington, d.c. gun laws. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkabl
, an did. this is for the marriage and sanctity of the family. gregg: did you read the iowa civil rights act? >> probably some time in 1991 when i was preparing for the new york bar. gregg: if you bothered to read the law you would have noticed that all you have to do is prove that gender is a factor, one factor, that's all. joey? >> arthur loves when i say this so i'm going to say it, this is outrageous. this is a blow to family values everywhere. when they couched the decision, that is the court in terms of family values. what about the values of this woman? what about equality, what about decency. what about respecting women and not treating them as objects. this decision goes too far. but consider the source, gregg, it was a decision mailed pwaoeupb seven males, which speaks to the need of having diversity on that court. when we look at the court's decision if it were not for our agenda mr. aidala she would have not been terminated. >> this was a woman running a law practice and one of her men was interfering with her marriage she could fire him as well. >> note hat gregg: the iowa c
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
in the south. one of the things that happened after the civil rights movement is we saw more and more of the institutions that were about political education, that were not just about pipelining black, particularly blooek leaders who were going to look at and develop an understand the policies that were necessary for the black community. in order for it to thrive. we have actually seen a demobilization of that infrastructure. so when we have this conversation like 30% of blaeks voting for strom thurmond, one of the things we have to think about is, we're responding to, this is the guy that made the phone call or wrote the letter that helped me out. it's a different kind of political education and engagement than saying -- what actually fixes some of the things that we need fixed in our community? how are we assessing our political leadership on that basis? that's something that's actually extremely important and we've been seeing less and less of it in many black communities. >> i want to agree with my friend, mayor reed. the republican party is a learning party and it knows it has to
, instead of trying to have more civil discussions like this one about how we can get to solve our problems. >> all right, karl, nighty and nice? >> yeah, joe is always in the ethereal big things. i am in little things. naughty list. all people who want to ban nativity display in public. santa will give them coal dust, not even coal. nice, gosh dang it, thank goodness for guys that made the "sky fall" movie. great movie. steven spielberg is going to hate to hear this coming from me, a big liberal. i'm not. but he did a wonderful job the "lincoln" movie and great entertainment for the families in the holiday season. nice, "lincoln" and "sky fall." naughty, scrooges who want to deny christmas. >> all right. even the whiteboard on christmas eve. merry christmas, guys. thank you very much. doug, back to you. >> doug: all right. white board with no numbers. thank you, bret. coming up next, the inside story behind romney's loss. fox all-stars will discuss the latest report. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually li
. the also the civil war, unrest going on in syria. >> right. i see these various crises in the middle east and you named two of the most serious but adding what is happening in libya, in yemen and elsewhere, adding continuing threat of iran's nuclear weapons program, it support for terrorist groups like hamas and hezbollah, i could see all of these crises spinning together and the entire region growing out of control while the united states acts almost as if it is a bystander. this is unprecedented in recent decades to have such a weak, feckless in fact, u.s. role in the region. heather: do you see any change taking effect? >> well, i don't think so honestly. i don't think, for example the nomination of john kerry to be secretary of state or whomever the nominee for a new secretary of defense turns out to be, i don't see them changing the basic direction of obama's administration policy. i think this course we've been on in the past four years is directly attributable to the president himself. i think that will continue into his second term. in fact i would say, now that he is safely reele
sectarian civil war. we're talking a time frame of years. right now, jon, the death toll is about 45,000. a lot of people are saying that number could easily double in the coming months and years as this violence continues, jon. jon: the refugees keep streaming out of that war-torn country. leland vittert in jerusalem for us. leland, thank you. harris: new information from russia today where president vladmir putin has signed that bill banning americans from adopting russian children. we saw this coming and now it has happened. the bill angering americans and russians who say it victimizes the children just to make a political point. amy kellogg is live for us in london with more. amy, why have they passed this law? >> reporter: well, harris, the law is named after dima yakovlev, a toddler who died in the custody of his adoptive american parents a few years ago in the washington, d.c. area. he was left in a car in the heat but basically, it does appear that this law was actually a reaction to a law passed in the united states. it puts travel bans, visa bans and asset freezes on 60 ru
, qaddafi fell, everything was over. now looks like the syrian civil war could go on for years. right now, patti ann, about 45,000 people killed there sectarian violence continues and that number could easily double. back to you. patti ann: leland, thank you. gregg: a disturbing case of deja vu as a man is pushed to his death right in front of a new york city subway for the second time this month. an update on the hunt for his killer. patti ann: glow glowing tribute to a man remembered as one of the great military leaders of his generation. lawmakers and leaders stop to honor general norman schwarzkopf could have, the man who led desert storm, perhaps better known by his nickname storm minute norman ti. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewi
the truck was actually carrying. there is no word yetcaused this. jamie: well, right now there is word of a high level defection in syria's civil war as the general of the country's military police reportedly switches sides and joins the opposition. ambassador john bolton joining us now, former u.n. ambassador to the united nations fox news contributor. am bass do, great to see you. thanks for joining us. >> good morning. merry christmas belatedly. jamie: merry christmas to you. how significant is this defection away from assad. >> i think it has couple important aspects. this is another high level general. there is political implication there. we'll have to wait and see whether it induces other regime military authorities to defect as well. second, for the opposition undoubtedly this will give them important information about what's going on inside assad's military, perhaps inside the regime itself. what's the disposition of forces? are they well-armed? what is their morale? where might they be vulnerable? whether this general is welcomed by the opposition and contributes to them mili
-- this is the time for considered discussion, for a civil debate. but what the nra has been proposing and has been talking about will not lead to that. >> all right. certainly a lot of fire behind this debate. maria core dona, amy holmes, thank you very much. nice to see you both. >> thank you. >> happy holidays. >> same to you, as well. see you next year. >> absolutely. >> all right. thank you. >> all right. >>> a young author raising money to help other kids who are just like him. how a rare genetic disease inspired this little boy to give back. >>> i want to share a story now about a young author with a rare genetic disease. he's raising money to help other kids who are just like him. here's dr. sanjay gupta with today's "human factor." >> reporter: 9-year-old evan moss is a boy who seemingly only cares about one simple thing. >> all of these, all filled with pokemon cards. >> reporter: unfortunately, his life isn't so simple. >> when evan was just a couple weeks old, he started having these little shaky movements. it was one arm that would just twitch a little bit. and it would last a few seco
such a divided nation right now. pastor rick warren talking yesterday on fox news sunday with chris wallace, talk being he's never seen this country as divided as it has been since the civil war. listen. >> i don't know what the biggest accomplishment would be. i really don't know that. my biggest disappointment is the disunity. president obama ran saying i'm going to be a unifier and our nation is more divided than ever before. i think it's more divided than at any time since the civil war. that's disheartening to me. >> gretchen: he was asked what prefaced that piece of sound we just played four. rick warren was asked, what do you believe president obama's biggest accomplishment has been in the four-plus years of his president any actually just four years now, leading into four more years. and he couldn't come up with something. remember, rick warren wanted to have both of the candidates do one of those seminar sessions together where they answered the same exact questions as john mccain and president obama did before president obama became president. many people loved that forum because they w
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15